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St. Pattyís By the Numbers
With St. Patrick's Day just around the corner, find out how it started and the financial impact of the Irish.


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The Irish have influenced more than just the color of beer.


Are you foaming at the mouth for some green beer? It's probably because youíre getting closer to that very special day when America celebrates all things Irish. And just in case you run into a leprechaun who quizzes you on your knowledge about the emerald isle, hereís some interesting facts about the Irish, provided by the U.S. Census department:

Kiss me Iím Irish: Close to 35 million Americans claim to be of Irish ancestry. Itís the second most frequently reported ancestry, the first being German. Thatís almost nine times the population of Ireland itself (around 4 million) and thatís 12 percent of the U.S. population as a whole. Where do a lot of them live? Massachusetts, of course, where 24 percent of the population claims Irish ancestry.

A significant portion of Irish-Americans are homeowners. The Census reports that 72 percent of householders of Irish ancestry own the home they live in. Thatís higher than the American average of 67 percent nationwide.

The median income for an Irish-American householder is $51,937, and 31 percent of Irish-Americans 25 or older have a bachelorís degree or higher.

Letís party like Irish rock stars: The U.S. alone produced 41.6 billion pounds of beef and 2.4 billion pounds of cabbage in 2005. And in 2004, the average American consumed 21.6 gallons of beer. Much of that may have come from the more than 350 breweries based in the U.S. that year.

Just like home: Last year, the U.S. imported close to $24 billion worth of goods from Ireland and exported $6.9 billion. Also, there are four cities in the U.S. named after the shamrock, the floral emblem of Ireland. There are also nine cities that share the name of Irelandís capital of Dublin. Thereís also an Emerald Isle in North Carolina.

Where and when: St. Patrickís Day was originally a religious holiday in honor of St. Patrick, who introduced Christianity to Ireland. The first St. Patrickís Day parade was held on March 17, 1762 in New York City. President Harry Truman was the first president to attend the parade in 1948. And March was proclaimed Irish-American Heritage Month in 1995 by Congress.

So there you have it, lads. Keep these trivial facts in mind this Saturday and you might be the center of conversation. Oh, donít forget to wear your green.



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Over 1 million couples turn to Hitched for expert marital advice every year. Sign up now for our newsletter & get exclusive weekly content that will entertain, educate and inspire your marriage.



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